Fall 2017 Group Subjects

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In years past, we’ve done quite a bit of school with all three of the big kids together. When they were younger and not as independent, it made sense to do that. Now that they are all doing most of their work independently, we don’t have to have “The Reading” or “Table Time”–but we haven’t cut it entirely.

Since we do Convocation together first thing and I keep that streamlined, I moved most other together subjects to a loop system of sorts. On my clipboard I have other resources listed along with bubbles to fill in for how many times I want to cover that topic or book per week. Some things happen every day and some are just once a week. This seems to work well, because if we have days that get away from us or days when it takes longer to get through individual teaching/discussion times, it’s ok for these things to drop off the schedule. I can always make up the material later in the week, or in the following week. I feel a lot of freedom to do this, because of the volume of independent work also happening.

After teaching times are done, we regroup at the table or couch to do The Reading. It’s not hard to pull everyone in for this, because they all enjoy it. Here is what we cover:

Poetry – Both reading selections and reviewing poems previously memorized. I didn’t get around to identifying a new piece for this term, so we just cycle through what we’ve already learned. Each kid also has an assigned poet per term, but those are read independently.

Plutarch – We read sections from Plutarch’s Lives daily, slowly working through the book from start to finish. It’s probably going to take us years if not decades. That’s ok. The idea is to learn how to see civic behavior, leadership, and character in a more nuanced light. Perhaps because the kids have a strong background in these stories from previous years, we have not found this onerous and we aren’t using any study guides. I read a section that feels like a complete part of the narrative, then one child narrates.

Church History – Rather than the individual assignments from Trial & Triumph, I just read one-two chapters per week and we narrate. We’ve read this book before, but it bears repeating.

Indiana History – I have mixed feelings about state history. I guess it’s a good idea if you are born and raised and live in one place all of your life. I personally had state history while living in California. So if you want to know anything about the goldrush, conquistadors, Spanish missions, and the like, I’m…still probably not your person. I vaguely remember some of these things. And I haven’t lived in California since that brief 4th and 5th grade window. So, I’m not willing to devote very much time to state history. Still, we do live here, so I toss in a few readings from a history spine and some historical fiction set in our state. We also have a membership to the Indiana State Museum and its 12 satellite museums this year.

Extra Science

The big kids all have complete science coverage in their independent work, but we like science and happen to own several texts that we haven’t done yet, so we read from one or the other of those most days. The Way Things Work is pretty cool, but in future years I might assign that as an independent read when the AO selections feel too sparse. I’m becoming less and less enthused about Apologia books, so may wind up selling off our collection eventually. Meanwhile, we keep reading.

Shakespeare

We’re doing Richard III this term, going slowly. I meant to identify some monologues to memorize, but never got to it. Suggestions welcome. We’ll read the play, listen to it, and probably watch it. Hannah has some Richard III material for history this year, so it will be fun for her to have this background when she gets to Richard III as a historical figure.

Artist Study

We have one Durer print per week for picture study, and are reading a good biography. Some weeks we do an art activity that ties in, for example making “wood prints” by carving styrofoam and rolling paint on them to press on paper.

Composer Study

We started out with Telemann and Corelli, but didn’t find much to connect to in terms of reading. I prefer to have a biography going (like one of Opal Wheeler’s) at the same time. So we listen to various pieces throughout the week, but not in an organized fashion right now. The kids recently switched piano teachers, and the new lessons are much more geared to learning to play classic repertoire, so we do listen to pieces and composers the kids are learning.

Nature Study

Sadly, I am not getting this one done. We have sketchbooks and little watercolor sets and water brushes and very nice pencils, but have only done two sketches all term. I’m having a really hard time identifying a spot in the schedule for this. My friend Heather is teaching nature study classes this fall, and I so wish I had signed us up! Maybe next time!

Dictation

We do dictation on Fridays, based on the catechism answer we’ve been studying all week.

Habit Discussion

We started off strong with these, but now it’s more ad hoc. Having a list on the clipboard does remind me to look for ways to work these things into the day, though.

Penmanship

Daily cursive practice is new. We were getting sloppy. I’m using Cursive Logic, which is a great system if you have kids who already know how to write in cursive, but who aren’t forming letters precisely or need some extra help to strengthen their penmanship.

This looks like a lot, but since we loop most of it, it doesn’t take long. If we finish early, we have time to fit in some extra chapters from our family read-aloud. I do miss the days when we did most of our school work as read-alouds together, but it’s nice to still have a few things we read together.

If you have multiple children in your homeschool, what subjects do you combine, if any? Do you loop any subjects or do everything every day?

 

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Jack’s 5th Grade

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Jack does just about everything full-throttle, so educating him is a bit of a wild ride. He’s either fiercely interested–discussing things at a wildly high level and wrangling ideas like untamed wildebeests–or he’s fiercely bored and dragging his feet and his pencil and having to learn the hard way to love what must be done.

Welcome to fifth grade at our house this fall.

IMG_6989Jack is doing a modified version of Ambleside Online Year 5. My modifications were adding several additional science books and biographies, and picking up the pace on a couple of other readings. I wanted to give him a little more challenge while also giving him space to get better at following through on assignments.

Like Hannah and Sarah, Jack has a weekly clipboard that lists his daily work, work done together with everyone else, and co-op classes (on the right) and the categories from which he chooses one assignment per day (on the left).

We have a daily hour or so in which we discuss his readings, written work, Latin assignment, and math. He narrates (tells back, in detail and sequence) every reading except for free reads, and he does one written narration per day. Each week he has to put on revised piece of writing into his history notebook and his literature notebook, and he writes all of his science experiments and observations in a separate science notebook. Jack’s readings are below, with links for books I added or have already reviewed separately.

History & Geography (all narrated*)

  • This Country of Ours
  • The Story of Mankind
  • The Complete Book of Marvels (Halliburton)
  • Geography (Van Loon)
  • What the World Eats
  • Abraham Lincoln’s World
  • Story of the World, Volume 4

Historical Biography (all narrated*)

  • A Passion for the Impossible (Lilias Trotter)
  • Always Inventing (Alexander Graham Bell)
  • Carry a Big Stick (Teddy Roosevelt)
  • Michael Faraday: Father of Electronics
  • Something Out of Nothing (Marie Curie)
  • George Washington Carver

Literature & Historical Fiction (all narrated*)

IMG_6991Poetry

  • Rudyard Kipling
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • John Greenleaf Whittier
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar

Science (all narrated* and all experiments written up)

Free Reading (not narrated, but required reading)

  • Black Horses for the King
  • Little Women
  • A Christmas Carol
  • Captains Courageous
  • Puck of Pook’s Hill
  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
  • The Prince and the Pauper
  • Treasure Island
  • Lad: A Dog
  • The Treasure Seekers
  • The Wouldbegoods
  • Anne of Green Gables
  • The Long Winter
  • Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
  • Hans Brinker
  • Carry On, Mr. Bowditch (this is re-re-re-re-read, but really, it’s so good)
  • Rifles for Watie
  • Across Five Aprils
  • Rilla of Ingleside
  • Falcons of France
  • Goodbye Mr. Chips
  • The Story of My Life
  • Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH
  • The Rescuers
  • The Cricket in Times Square
  • Homer Price
  • The Great Brain
  • King Arthur (Lanier version)
  • Moccasin Trail
  • Sacajawea (Bruchac version)

Bible

  • 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles
  • Matthew, Mark, Luke, John

Language

Math

  • Learn Math Fast
  • I’m still unsure where to place Jack this year, because he basically finished Saxon 7/6 and tested as ready forArt of Problem Solving Pre-Algebra, but he has a LOT of conceptual holes so I know AoPS would frustrate him. So, for now, we are focusing on Learn Math Fast through pre-algebra, in hopes that the conceptual review framework will help prepare him. And then maybe next semester–or even next year–we will dive in to AoPS.

Co-op (classes meet once a week)

  • Engineering
  • Handicrafts
  • Junior Achievement BizTown (economics)

Other (subjects we do together with the other kids, more in a separate post)

  • More science (The Way Things WorkApologia Chemistry and Physics)
  • Church history (Trial & Triumph)
  • Citizenship (Plutarch’s Lives)
  • Indiana state history (various historical fiction, biographies, history spine)
  • Literature (Shakespeare play per term–Richard III this fall, daily poetry, poetry memorization, family read-alouds)
  • Artist study (Durer, this term)
  • Composer study (we were doing Telemann and Corelli, but may switch to Kabalevsky)
  • Nature study (using John Muir Laws guide)
  • Piano lessons

And that’s fifth grade for Jack. Kind of intense some days, but often truly amazing. It’s the sort of person he is!

 

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The Middle Ages Meet Sci-Fi–a series for kids that adults will love, too

tripods booksI pre-read John Christopher’s excellent Tripod Series for Hannah (it’s a free read for Ambleside Online Year 7) and loved it. The premise is right up my alley: a dystopian future in which modern life reverts back to a medieval-like era after people fail to fight for their freedom. A small pocket of hold-outs struggle to regain freedom and restore what was lost. The narrative is compelling and prescient, and maintains a feeling of high adventure and great pacing while also reveling in details of medieval life and customs.

I can’t believe I missed this series as a kid, but as with most great children’s literature, it still works for adults.

Hannah tore through these books in a matter of hours, and highly recommends them. I’m trying to hold Jack and Sarah off until they get to AO7, but we’ll see.

This series would be great as a gift for a middle grade/middle school reader, but I could also see it being terrific as a family read-aloud or an audio book choice for long car trips. While you can get a boxed set, the individual books are actually cheaper on Amazon:

The White Mountains

The City of Gold and Lead

The Pool of Fire

When the Tripods Came (Note: this is a prequel. I accidentally read it first, but would recommend reading it last)

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