Hodge-podge: Ancient Rome Read Alouds

Our school year sputtered to an end when the reality of summer swim team gob-smacked us. Fortunately, we already had our required days in (plus three!) and had pretty much finished our semester’s foray into Roman times. Below are the books we read aloud together or which I read in order to better discuss them with the big kids. The big kids all read a ton of other related titles, but I’m only listing the ones I personally read.

The Roman Mysteries Series – I was surprised at how much we liked these books. The author, Caroline Lawrence, puts so much period detail into the books, but without making them feel didactic. So we learned all sorts of fascinating things about daily life in Roman times, but all in the course of rousing mysteries and problem solving. However, I will caveat that I only read the first four, and there were a couple of issues that I wanted to talk over with the kids, like a point where someone drinks too much (and has a terrible headache and says things they regret as a result), and a distressing choice made by one character’s mother. Both incidents were handled tastefully in the book, but really did require discussion. So be aware of that if you choose this series. Even so, I highly, highly recommend these books. The audio versions were great–check your library’s OverDrive app if you’ve got travel upcoming!

The Silver Branch and Outcast – Rosemary Sutcliff is one of my favorite children’s authors, so we snapped up her books about Rome. Actually, the kids read a couple of others and liked them as well, so really you can just look out for this author and be assured that you won’t go wrong. Her characters are complex and well-drawn, action is excellent, and you always wind up with great insight into the time periods covered. Both of these books covered Britain in Roman times, which was fascinating.

Beric the Briton – Another solid choice about Roman Britain is G.A. Henty. Although his books can be a bit slow to start, overall they are great adventure stories. I always look for Henty at used book stores, but you can also find good audio versions.

Detectives in Togas – I didn’t love this one as much this time around (having read it the last time we did Rome four years ago)–it’s not particularly noteworthy as literature, and falls far short of Sutcliff or Henty or Lawrence for historical detail. If you’re short on time, or your kids need an easy-ish read but you’re not that concerned about historical depth, this book is fine. The kids like it as a story.

Julius Caesar – Naturally, we chose JC as our Shakespeare play of the term. We read it out loud together taking parts, and also listened to a dramatized audio version. Although I wouldn’t say it was my favorite Shakespeare play, it was good.

Archimedes and the Door of Science – OK, Archimedes was technically a Greek. But I already did the Greek read-alouds post. So here you go, Archimedes, old boy, we’re sticking you with the Romans. At any rate, this was a great book–a nice mix of biography, history, and science. We really enjoyed it, and would recommend it as a read-aloud or read-alone.

In Search of a Homeland – If you’re looking for a solid retelling of the Aeneid, I recommend this one. It will make more sense if your kids are already familiar with the Odyssey, but is pretty crucial for understanding Roman history, in my opinion. Next time around I think we’re going to go with the real deal, but in the meantime, this retelling is great (side note: the kids also read The Aeneid for Boys and Girls and said it was ok, but they preferred In Search of a Homeland).

The Story of the Romans and Famous Men of Rome – Reading both of these got a little repetitive as we read about the same people back and forth–we should have chosen one and left it at that. However, having read two of these books about famous Romans, the kids and I are SO primed for Plutarch.

Plutarch’s Lives  – So after reading about famous Greeks and famous Romans, we dove right in to Plutarch and I was surprised and pleased to see that the kids were ready to interact with it. Why read Plutarch after we already read about many of these people in other books? That’s like saying “but we’ve read the Jesus Storybook Bible, so we don’t need to read the WHOLE Bible, right?” Plutarch was required reading for most of history, and is really a civics/government primer, as well as a general springboard for discussion about character, leadership, and being a good citizen. We started with Poplicola because that’s what everyone says to do, and because we were familiar with him. Then we just went to the front of the book and started with the first life, Theseus. We’ll go straight through from here on out and eventually we’ll have read the whole phone book. It’s going to be awesome.

SPQR – One last note: this one was not for kids, but I read it as background for myself. It was a slog, but I think that was because I read it on the Kindle app on my phone. That’s a handy thing, but not the best way for me to read/learn. A better reference for ancient times is Susan Wise Bauer’s The History of the Ancient World (link is to my original review, when I read it as background in 2012).

And here we are in summer “break” (or the break it would be, were swim team not in the picture!). I think the year went well overall. I saw a lot of improvement and maturing in abilities. I changed some things, and am contemplating ways to make our next school year run even more smoothly. This was the last year–for a while at least–that I plan for the three big kids to be in the same history/literature time frame. It’s funny. Initially we began combining for history and literature because I couldn’t imagine how I could keep up with three separate eras, or why the kids would want to be alone in one. Now, the opposite is true. I think the kids are in a spot where they need the individual ownership and space. We’ll still do lots of read-alouds together, because that’s just who we are, but we’ll do different independent reads. I’m excited to see how it works out.

Meanwhile, summer reading! What’s on deck at your house?

 

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