Sarah’s Third Grade

DSC_0147The biggest shift for Sarah this year is in her doing almost all of her readings independently. Since she is the most independent of all of the kids (so far) that was not a huge leap for her, and she is handling third grade with aplomb.

I started with Ambleside Online Year 3, adding a couple of things and deleting others. Primarily, she’s covering the 1400s-1600s in history.

As with the other big kids, Sarah has a weekly checklist to remind her of her daily work (copywork, a written narration, math assignment, typing, French, piano, chores, etc) and she can choose one assignment per category from the list on the left-hand side of her checklist.

In our daily one-on-one time, we talk over her readings (Sarah gives detailed and interesting narrations, so even if I wasn’t pre-reading–which I am–I would know what was going on in all of her books to the letter!), do math lessons, and correct her written work.

IMG_6985Here are her books for the school year (books linked are things I added to AO or have already reviewed separately):

History & Geography (all narrated*)

  • This Country of Ours
  • A Child’s History of the World
  • Our Island Story
  • Explorations
  • New Nations
  • The Discovery of New Worlds
  • The Awakening of Europe

Historical Biography (all narrated*)

  • Michaelangelo
  • Marco Polo
  • Bard of Avon
  • Good Queen Bess
  • Landing of the Pilgrims
  • Squanto
  • Unknown to History: the Captivity of Mary of Scotland

Literature & Historical Fiction (all narrated*)

  • The Princess and the Goblin
  • Children of the New Forest
  • The Jungle Book (books 1 and 2)
  • American Tall Tales
  • Tales from Shakespeare
  • The Heroes
  • *I would like to find a good retelling of Spencer’s Faerie Queene, but Amazon does not currently oblige.*

IMG_6986Poetry

  • William Blake, selections
  • Sara Teasdale, selections
  • Hilda Conkling, selections
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, selections

Science (all narrated* and all experiments written up)

  • Pagoo (sea life)
  • Science Lab in a Supermarket
  • A Drop of Water
  • Secrets of the Woods

Free Reading (not narrated, but required reading)

Bible

  • Luke, John
  • Exodus, Leviticus
  • Psalms

Language

  • French – Duolingo
  • English – daily writing assignments and spelling, incidental grammar as it comes up, weekly dictation

IMG_6987Math

Co-op (classes meet once a week)

Other (subjects we do together with the other kids, more in a separate post)

  • More science (The Way Things WorkApologia Chemistry and Physics)
  • Church history (Trial & Triumph)
  • Citizenship (Plutarch’s Lives)
  • Indiana state history (various historical fiction, biographies, history spine)
  • Literature (Shakespeare play per term–Richard III this fall, daily poetry, poetry memorization, family read-alouds)
  • Artist study (Durer, this term)
  • Composer study (we were doing Telemann and Corelli, but may switch to Kabalevsky)
  • Nature study (using John Muir Laws guide)
  • Piano lessons

And that’s Sarah’s third grade so far!

Note: This post contains a few Amazon affiliate links, but links to other websites are not affiliated. For more details on the AO booklist, please check the AO website

 

The Yes Effect

yes effectI’ve looked forward to reading The Yes Effect for several years now, because the co-author, Darcy Wiley, is a real life friend of mine. Hearing about powerful interviews with missionaries from around the world, the writing process, and how the book took shape made me eager to read the final product.

And I was not disappointed. The idea for the book came from Luis Bush’s work in the 10/40 movement, a missions strategy that sought to bring the Gospel to the most unreached people groups. The Yes Effect tells the story of Bush’s lifetime of missions work, but also pulls in the stories of many other missionaries who have served around the world, from a wide variety of backgrounds. Structured around particular challenges to live and pray in a way that makes us open to doing God’s work wherever we’re called, the chapters are not only a fascinating look at modern missions history, but also a call for all of us–missionaries or not–to look for where God is working and make sure we are saying yes to the work He has for us to do.

As I mentioned in a newsletter earlier this month, one thing I really liked about this book was the way Darcy and Luis highlighted the ordinary sides of the missionaries, many of whose stories are amazing and totally outside the experience of someone living in comfortable suburbia. While not being prescriptive–how could it be, since predicting what the Holy Spirit is about to do would be foolhardy–The Yes Effect is a thoughtful invitation to pray a bit differently, think about the world a bit differently, and look for opportunities in a different way than we may be used to doing.

The Yes Effect is thought-provoking, compelling, and full of interesting stories of modern missions. I’d recommend it for believers as inspiring regardless of your current level of missions focus.

 

Disclosure: The author of this book is a friend, and I received a review copy from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. Book links in this post are Amazon affiliate links.

In which we tackle middle school

DSC_0114Long ago, my aunt commented that I might want to use “homeschool” as a blog category rather than “preschool” because someday the children would get older. At the time, it felt like our older three kids were babies and toddlers and preschoolers for approximately 47 years. And then it seemed the younger two were only babies for around three seconds each.

Skewed time perception. It happens to the best of us (cue Simon & Garfunkel song).

Meanwhile, Hannah hit middle school like a Mack truck.

You’re thinking, “Like a Mack truck? Is that a good thing, or a bad thing?” I’m thinking, “Both.”

FullSizeRenderIn many ways, this year is a jump for Hannah, not so much because we switched curriculum (although we did) but because I moved her up into a pretty challenging level of readings. She’s ready for it, and thriving, and I’ve been really pleased overall. Every week she has a checklist so she can do most of her work independently. She chooses one assigned reading from each category on the left, and then is also responsible for what’s on the right (which is a combination of independent work, things she does with me, and things we do together with the other kids).

Every day Hannah and I have a designated hour or so when we discuss her readings, I correct her writing, and we do math and Latin. Here is what she’s up to for school. (Note: We are using Ambleside Online Year 7 with some modifications. I didn’t do Amazon links for the AO books unless I’ve already reviewed them separately.)

History & Geography (all narrated*)

  • The Birth of Britain, by Winston Churchill
  • Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People
  • The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle on Alfred the Great
  • Battle of Hastings, by William of Malmesbury
  • The Magna Carta
  • New Nations
  • The Brendan Voyage
  • How the Heather Looks

Historical Biography (all narrated*)

  • The Life of King Alfred, by Bishop Asser
  • Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, by Mark Twain
  • A Heroine of France

Art History (all narrated*)

  • The Story of Painting

Literature & Historical Fiction (all narrated*)

  • Ivanhoe
  • Beowulf
  • The History of English Literature
  • The Age of Chivalry
  • A Taste of Chaucer
  • In Freedom’s Cause
  • History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea
  • The Daughter of Time
  • The Once and Future King

Poetry

  • Alfred, Lord Tennyson (selections)
  • John Keats (selections)
  • The Idylls of the King
  • The Grammar of Poetry

Government/Economics/Citizenship/Logic (all narrated*)

  • Whatever Happened to Penny Candy
  • Ourselves
  • How to Read a Book
  • The Fallacy Detective

Science (all narrated* and all experiments written up)

  • The Elements
  • The Mystery of the Periodic Table
  • The Sea Around Us
  • Eric Sloane’s Weather Book
  • First Studies of Plant Life
  • Adventures With a Microscope
  • Signs and Seasons
  • Great Astronomers
  • Lay of the Land

IMG_6973Free Reading (not narrated, but required reading)

Bible

Language

Math

Co-op (classes meet once a week)

  • Engineering
  • Literary analysis
  • Machine sewing

Other (subjects we do together with the other kids, more in a separate post)

  • More science (The Way Things Work, Apologia Chemistry and Physics)
  • Church history (Trial & Triumph)
  • Citizenship (Plutarch’s Lives)
  • Indiana state history (various historical fiction, biographies, history spine)
  • Literature (Shakespeare play per term–Richard III this fall, daily poetry, poetry memorization, family read-alouds)
  • Artist study (Durer, this term)
  • Composer study (we were doing Telemann and Corelli, but may switch to Kabalevsky)
  • Nature study (using John Muir Laws guide)
  • Piano lessons

Notes on how we do this:

  • If you wonder about the weekly checklist, I break Hannah’s readings up into categories, and she has to read one selection from each category each day–an amazing idea I took from Kathy Livingston. From those readings, she chooses one per day to write a written narration (composition) about, and has to be prepared to narrate (tell back in detail and sequence what happened in the reading and be prepared to discuss issues and themes) each of the others. Once a week, she has to put at least one second draft piece of writing into each of her serious keep-this-forever notebooks: history, literature, and science.
  • Not all books are assigned each term.
  • Yes, I’m pre-reading all of this. Mostly so I can be prepared for daily discussions, but also for my own edification and/or nostalgia!

And that’s Hannah’s sixth grade so far!

Note: This post contains a few Amazon affiliate links, but links to other websites are not affiliated. For more details on the AO booklist, please check the AO website

The Madwoman Upstairs

madwoman-upstairsIt has been ages since I’ve read something just for myself, so last weekend I took a pause in my pre-reading for school and reveled in TWO entire books for myself. It was marvelously restorative.

One was The Madwoman Upstairs – a wildly clever, tremendously funny, well-plotted homage to the Bronte family, Oxford, and competing modes of literary criticism. I’ve put aside several Bronte spin-offs this year (a book club I’m in is doing Jane Eyre next month) and so I didn’t have high hopes for Lowell’s take, but I found it delightful.

The book is a bit of a mystery story, borrowing bits of structure from Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Agnes Grey, and a bit of a commentary on how to read a book. This is all bound up in a well-written story with characters that are interesting without being too slavish to Bronte casts. It was beautifully done, and is worth a read just to admire how Lowell pulled it off.

As a lifelong fan of Jane Eyre (I read it for the first time in second grade!), a total Anglophile, and a bookworm–to say nothing of being a person in desperate need of a stress-relieving read–I deeply enjoyed The Madwoman Upstairs and highly recommend it.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

Starting the day on the right foot

IMG_6950Convocation is, very simply, everyone showing up at the table to start the day together. It’s the sort of thing I would still do even if we sent the kids away to school, but since we homeschool, it’s also the beginning of the school day. This has evolved over the years, as I (characteristically) started out trying to cram too much in or be more free form, but ultimately I have found that in school and life the more I can make something a system and routine, the more likely it is to get done. And the more I can hone in on what is actually important, the more likely we are to continue.

This year, convocation only includes a few things, all spiritual, for a number of reasons.

1) It makes sure those things don’t fall off the table.

In years when I’ve put Bible, scripture memory, singing, and catechism at bedtime or during other reading time, I’ve been tempted to let it slide. We get tired, we have math to do, my voice is giving out… For the past couple of years, we’ve done spiritual things first, and it makes a good habit.

2) It keeps things simple and short.

My clipboard is set up to show me what I have to do for the school day from start to finish. Convocation is at the top and only has a handful of items. If people are dragging or we have places to be, that’s ok. Convocation doesn’t stretch on forever. Other important things like poetry and art and whatnot fit into other parts of our day. And because I know convocation only takes 20 minutes or so, I’m not inwardly panicked that we won’t get to everything else.

I will say that the only thing on my list before convocation is inspection, to remind me to check up that everyone actually handled personal hygiene, did their morning jobs, made beds, etc. Inspection is pretty fast, and maybe someday it will dawn on these people that tooth brushing is a daily requirement and then I will not have to ask. I’m not holding my breath. 🙂 At any rate, in case it’s of interest, here is our convocation list this fall:

Prayer – Sometimes one of the kids prays, sometimes all of them pray popcorn-style, sometimes it’s just me. We pray for teachable hearts and good focus, thank God for the day and opportunity to learn, and pray for missionaries or people we know who are sick or in trouble as those things come up.

Song – We sing a hymn or song a cappella. I have each of our songs printed out and on my clipboard. A sticky note pokes out the side to mark the song for that day, and we just rotate through. The edge of the sticky note that hangs out says, “Lift up your hearts” to remind me to say that. In the past, some of us have had a hard time remembering that we sing to worship, not to be noisy or annoy our siblings or practice our beat-boxing, so this reminds us to put aside any grumpiness or fuss to tune our hearts. After I say “Lift up your hearts” the kids respond, “We lift them up to the Lord” and then I start singing and they join in. Our song rotation includes:

  • How Firm a Foundation
  • All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name
  • Come, Thou Almighty King
  • May the Mind of Christ My Savior
  • To God Be the Glory
  • Be Thou My Vision
  • Lead On, O King Eternal
  • Praise Ye the Lord, The Almighty
  • Holy Holy Holy
  • Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise
  • Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee
  • All Creatures of Our God and King
  • Psalm 1
  • Rejoice, the Lord is King

Review Passage – We review one Bible passage per day. I read along with the kids reciting, and I don’t require perfection or put them on the spot. I figure there is value to repeating Scripture over and over again and in the long run this puts more of it in their hearts. Our passages currently include:

  • 1 Peter 5: 1-11
  • Romans 8: 1-17
  • 1 Corinthians 13
  • Psalm 19
  • John 1: 1-18
  • Philippians 2
  • 1 Chronicles 16: 8-36
  • Psalm 16

Bible Chapter – On alternating days, I read a chapter from either the Old Testament, New Testament, or Proverbs. We’re reading through 1 Chronicles and Luke currently, and for Proverbs we just do the chapter that corresponds to the day of the month. Often, I will ask one or more of the kids to narrate (tell back) what happened in the chapter, unless someone has a question or observation.

Catechism Review – Each day, we review five of the questions and answers we’ve already covered. I keep a bookmark in Training Hearts, Teaching Minds to remind me of where we are, and when we get to the end of what we’ve learned, we start over with question one.

Catechism Biblestudy – Using the book linked above, we review the week’s new question and answer, and read the short Biblestudy for that day. In the book, Starr Meade helpfully has six short devotions written around the Scripture proofs for that question. So it gives us a chance to see where the Bible talks about that answer (ie, Why do we believe this? Because it’s in the Bible, not because someone else said so) and understand the idea from different angles. We often spin off into a short discussion here, too.

And that’s it. It looks like a lot in a blog post, but it’s only four check boxes on the list, and it’s done within half an hour. Then I send Hannah off to do independent work, Sarah to computer lessons, and Jack collects his things for teaching time, as I mentioned in my school day overview post. I sometimes use the transition to put Margaret down for a nap or switch a load of laundry, but usually we just proceed pretty smoothly to the next thing on the list.

How do you start your school day?

Disclosure: This post contains an affiliate link. Thank you for clicking through to Amazon from A Spirited Mind!

Reading, Thinking, and Writing Effects

Over the summer, I read Stein on Writing, which was helpful from a professional development perspective since I write for my paying job, but, as with so many books, I found it spurred my thinking along several different lines, and caused me to ponder how I read, think, and communicate.

What counts is not what is said, but the effect of what is meant.

stein-on-writingI’m often frustrated by how relentlessly visual our culture is. People are so used to consuming primarily visual media that even print materials often read like a description of a TV drama. In the quote above, Stein contends that good dialogue is not about the exact words used, but the effect the words have on the story. I think the same holds true for action. This is why bedroom scenes invariably fail in novels (although, unfortunately, authors more often take this fact as a thrown gauntlet rather than a cautionary tale)–the play-by-play is not important, rather it’s the effect on the story of what the action means.

In addition to informing our writing, the idea also carries weight with spoken communication. Rather than oversharing details, we might do better to focus on communicating the effect an action or instance had on us–making it more universal and easier to understand.

There is a time and place for details. But, in our current milieu–speaking for myself, at least–a dose of restraint might be a more necessary corrective.

A writer cannot be a Pollyanna. He is in the business of writing what other people think but don’t say…the single characteristic that most makes a difference in the success of an article or nonfiction book is the author’s courage in revealing normally unspoken things about himself or his society…tell the truth in an interesting way.

I often have moments, when I read really good books, of noting that an author has perfectly articulated something I’ve experienced but never mentioned. But telling the truth in an interesting way is more difficult that you’d think. Wendy pointed me to this fascinating article about how difficult it is for Christians to write redemption, because it seems to defy description. I wonder if the answer might be–as in the observation above–to leave off with attempts at play-by-play descriptions and focusing on “the effect of what is meant.”

In the end, you write what you read.

If this is not a clarion call to being judicious with my reading shelf (and my kids’), I’m not sure what is.

I read books about writing both as a writer and as a reader. I usually find tidbits to help me in my work, but invariably find food for thought that makes me more thoughtful and discerning in my literary life as well.

What do you think?

 

Disclosure: This post contains an affiliate link. Thank you for clicking through to Amazon from A Spirited Mind!

Preschool, Take Four

IMG_6697Someone asked me what I did differently with preschool the fourth time around.

Answer: not much. Really, my approach to preschool boils down to one thing. A lot of reading.

At our house, preschool for any age (2, 3, 4) consists of:

  • A story from a Bible story book (this is our new favorite)
  • A story from Aesop’s Fables
  • Several pages of one of our collection of Mother Goose anthologies (it turns out that nursery rhymes are key for pre-reading skills, but I also think they are a good introduction to poetry and they turn up in literature all the time) – a few of our favorites are this, this, this, this, this, and thisbut we have others. 🙂
  • Five (or more) picture books from our collection

Ideally, I kick off the day with Eliza’s one-on-one preschool time, because she’s always up and raring to go early and it fills her tank so she can listen and color or play quietly alongside the big kids when they are getting my focus the rest of the morning. Eliza turned 4 in May, so this year she adds in reading lessons (5 minutes) and some basic handwriting and numbers (5 minutes) to the usual preschool routine described above. She is fairly desperate to learn to read, and is diligently identifying words and sounds whenever she can. She sits for long stretches of time with books in her lap, attempting to read them, then announces to all and sundry that it’s VERY difficult to read when you can’t read WORDS. We’ll get there.

We use picture books from a variety of lists, from Ambleside Online, Sonlight, etc. I started with lists but didn’t stop there. , Over time I developed a sense of what kind of books I like to read and share with the kids–interesting illustrations, vivid language, no didactic lessons or tiresome data or cartoon characters–with good books I feel like I know it when I see it.

I’d love to read more picture books than our preschool time, and some days I do, but even when I don’t get to it, Eliza has a lot of reading in her life. In addition to her preschool reading, Eliza sits in on all Bible and school reading for the other kids, our family read-aloud time, and her older siblings read to her daily. Some days, if time allows, I do Margaret’s reading (five or more board books) right after Eliza’s preschool, and both girls listen to both types of books.

My focused preschool time with Eliza takes 30-45 minutes per day, depending on the length of books we read. This is not to say that she doesn’t do other preschool-y things throughout the day, such as cutting up bits of paper with scissors, playing with playdough, coloring, doing puzzles, lacing cards, etc. We have a box of those things that she can use during school time, and she does. But I’ve found that kids actually do better and enjoy those things more when Mama isn’t hovering. Fortunately, with five children in the posse, helicopter parenting is right out!

And that’s preschool at our house this year (you can read more about our school day here). If you have preschoolers, what does your day look like?

 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

Hodge Podge: Middle Ages for Kids

The Middle Ages makes for a terrific literary setting. Here are some read-alouds and read-alongs we’ve enjoyed recently:

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood – Pyle’s version of the familiar Robin Hood tales is really excellent. Do yourself and your kids a favor and don’t bother with abridged versions of this one! You don’t need Classic Starts or Great Illustrated Classics EVER, in my opinion, but in this case especially you will lose almost all of the literary quality and sparkle of the language.

Black Horses for the King – This imaginative story follows King Arthur’s need for larger horses to carry armored knights. Along with a high adventure storyline, the book is a fascinating account of how different horse breeds were needed for different conditions, and how they could have been procured in the Middle Ages.

Sir Gawaine and the Green Knight – I had never previously read this story in the full verse, and it’s not an easy read. It might have been better read aloud. If you’re not QUITE used to reading poetry, this would be a tough sell. We like poetry, and read it daily, but it was still a challenge, both for me and for Hannah! We had a conversation about how and whether chivalry = morality, and where Gawaine stumbled and why it was a problem. Most of the detail had gone over Hannah’s head, but in case you’re turning this book over to a kid, be aware that you’ll want to preview and discuss the moral issues. One more note: we went with the Raffel translation, but I wonder if we would have enjoyed Tolkein’s more. If you’ve read both, tell me your thoughts!

The Knight’s Fee – I love Rosemary Sutcliff novels, and this one was particularly good. The story captures the conflict between Saxon and Norman cultures one generation after the Battle of Hastings, and gives a good picture of the process of integration there, as well as the question of old Britons and Brittany. And it’s also a great adventure story that will appeal to boys and girls (and, importantly if you’re reading aloud or listening, also to parents).

Rolf and the Viking Bow – This book does an excellent job describing Iceland in the Middle Ages, but has one of those plots that leaves you saying “oh, not ONE MORE BAD THING happening to the main character!” I got a little annoyed with that, but of course it ultimately turns out all right in the end.

The Door in the Wall – I  read this book multiple times as a child, and we’ve read it aloud at least twice. This summer we listened to it on audio during a car trip and really enjoyed the production. We got the unabridged audio, which had nice music and sound effects–not too many and very well done. We particularly enjoyed the medieval style music and felt it set the scene nicely.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for clicking through to Amazon from A Spirited Mind!

School Day, Fall 2017

DSC_0234We’re about three weeks in to the new school year, and, surprisingly, the schedule is going really well. I made some significant changes, so I’m recording them here–for my own remembrance and in case it helps anyone else. I will add in posts giving more detail about different sections, and link up as I go.

First off, I say “schedule” but really I mean “flow of events.” We have a hard stop every day by 1pm at the latest, and it does take us five hours to get through the part of school where I’m actively teaching (various children often take longer than that to complete independent assignments). So I aim for an early start, but the chips fall where they may. Links below are to longer posts about each item.

Preschool – 30-60 minutes – Eliza (4) tends to be up early and raring to go while the big kids are still straggling in, so I often begin the day with focused preschool time. This takes 30-45 minutes. If we really get an early start, I also roll Margaret’s board book reading time in, which takes another 15 minutes. While this happens, the big kids finish breakfast and do morning jobs and personal hygeine.

Convocation – 20-30 minutes – The big kids come to the table and we officially start our day with prayer, a hymn or Psalm, Bible memory, a Bible chapter, catechism review, and a short devotional. Time varies depending on what we’re reviewing and what sort of discussion crops up. After convocation, the little girls are excused from the table but they stick around playing quietly (or not-so-quietly), coloring, etc. Margaret (22 months) takes a morning nap around 9:30am.

Jack’s Teaching Time – 45-60 minutes – Hannah (11) goes off to do independent assignments, Sarah (8) has 30 minutes of computer time (10 minutes typing, 20 minutes French), and Jack (10) gets one-on-one time with me to do his math lesson, go over his writing assignments, do his narrations and book discussions, get his Latin assignment, and get spelling and grammar feedback from the previous day’s writing.

Hannah’s Teaching Time – 45-60 minutes – Sarah goes off to do her independent work, Jack has 30-40 minutes of computer time (10 minutes typing, 20 minutes French, sometimes 10 minutes Latin if there is a video that day), and Hannah gets one-on-one time with me. I check on her Bible assignment, get her narrations, go over her writing assignments, teach her math lesson, teach her Latin lesson (or give out an assignment, depending on the day), and go over spelling and grammar as needed. Because of the depth of her readings, the narrations and book discussions can take a long time, but usually we can get this done within an hour.

Sarah’s Teaching Time – 30-45 minutes – Jack goes off to do independent work, Hannah gets computer time (10 minutes typing, 20 minutes French, 10 minutes Latin or Pre-algebra if there are videos for either subject that day), and Sarah gets one-on-one time. I hear her narrations and talk over her readings with her, correct her writing, give out assignments, and teach her math lesson. Her session is shorter, because she’s not doing Latin yet and she’s a bit more…shall we say…efficient about her teaching time than some of her siblings.

The Reading – 60 minutes – All three big kids are doing their readings independently, but we still have some subjects we’re looping together. For about an hour after teaching times, we do poetry, poetry memory work, Plutarch, church history, Indiana state history, extra science, Shakespeare, dictation, composer study, artist study, and nature study. We don’t do all of these every day, about which I will say more in another post. Depending on the time, the kids usually eat their lunches while I’m still reading, or we switch to listening to music from our composer during lunch.

Hard Stop – As aforementioned, we have a hard stop every day. At 1pm or thereabouts the little girls take naps, the big kids finish up independent work, and I start my work day. On Thursdays we all go to our homeschool co-op for the afternoon, but otherwise I’m working from 1-5 or 6. We have babysitters in the house most of those days to keep the lid on.

Extras – We have a new piano teacher who will come to the house Tuesdays from 5:00-6:30pm to give all of the big kids lessons. The kids each take three elective classes at co-op, and Sarah is doing soccer through our church. Jack has a dissection club once a month. All three big kids go to various church activities for their age groups as they come up. We are taking a break from swim team in September due to my work load, but hope to resume later this fall.

Evening – Most days, I hear more narrations, field math questions, check notebooks, and answer questions as I make dinner. I try not to correct Latin while cooking, because disasters–both linguistic and culinary–so often ensue. After dinner and our nightly chores/dance party, we usually read aloud a chapter or two from a non-school book. Right now we’re reading Sticks Across the Chimney and enjoying it thoroughly.

Prep – My prep work this year is extensive, because each older kid doing an Ambleside Online year independently (more on that later, too), and I’m pre-reading all of it. I love it, because the books are terrific, but it’s a lot. I started the year six weeks ahead for each level, and am slowly trying to get through the next term before we finish the first one. We’ll see how that shapes up. I have a notebook for each level and make notes on each book I read as I go, so that I can remember things to flag for discussion and make sure the kids are giving thorough and thoughtful written or oral narrations. The scheduling itself has been fairly straight-forward, though, once I figured out my system.

IMG_6942

Checking Up – As always, it’s important for me to have a checklist so I can keep us all on track and visualize what has to happen for a week of school. I changed my checklist this year to better reflect what I’m doing in each teaching time, what I’m checking each day for independent work, and how often we need to loop various things in The Reading. I color-coded dots for each child, which reminds me which child has done what without requiring more real estate on the page.

So that’s the broad overview of our homeschool this fall. How is the year shaping up for you?

Hodge Podge: Devotional Books

This week’s literary mix is made up of a variety of books about faith, theology, and Biblestudy.

Praying With Paul – In this excellent study of how Paul prays in his epistles, D. A. Carson both illuminates scripture passages and draws out excellent teaching and applications about prayer. Highly recommended.

The Good News We Almost Forgot – Kevin DeYoung’s well-written teaching on the Heidelberg Catechism would make for interesting family Biblestudy. DeYoung structures the book on a weekly framework, because he writes that the Heidelberg Catechism was originally designed to be preached through week by week. Because we’re still working through the Westminster as a family, I wound up using this on my own, but I could see handing it off to an older kid for their devotional reading. I especially appreciated the sections on communion.

Worship by the Book – Our church is looking for a new director of worship, so Josh and I have been talking more about it than usual (since he’s very involved in that ministry, we tend to talk about it a lot anyway) and it was interesting timing to read this book on worship. Presenting different viewpoints–Anglican, Free Church, and Presbyterian–the book highlights different ways that people approach biblical worship. Tim Keller’s section was remarkable, as was editor D. A. Carson’s opening essay. This book offers lots to think about and discuss.

Matthew for Everyone (Part 1 and Part 2), Mark for Everyone – I’ve enjoyed reading through N.T. Wright’s commentaries on the Gospels. He has a way of making the books come alive in a fresh way while sticking close to the text that I really appreciate. The books are written in an accessible voice (hence the “for everyone” moniker) but are a great way to facilitate slow, careful reading of familiar passages.

Gospel Identity – Our small group did this study over the last semester and it was fine. I wanted to love the book, but honestly, it wasn’t my favorite. Fortunately, we like our group and we’ll start something new this fall!

Have you read any good books of theology or Biblestudy lately?

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